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Ancestors of Carla Dickerson and David Goodloe



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James Winfield /COLEMAN/ and Edna /BERRY/




Husband James Winfield /COLEMAN/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Edna /BERRY/

           Born: 18 Feb 1902
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           Died: 9 Jan 1996 - Saluda, Saluda, South Carolina
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         Father: George Huiet /BERRY/ (1870-1904)
         Mother: Katie /BERRY/ (1878-1974)





Children

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Edmund /HARWELL/ and Elizabeth /BERRY/




Husband Edmund /HARWELL/ 1

           Born: Abt 1524 - Besford, Worcester, England
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           Died: 1594
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         Father: Thomas /HARWELL/ (Abt 1501-1564) 1
         Mother: Margery /VAMPAGE/ (Abt 1510-1545) 1


       Marriage: Abt 1555 - Oxfordshire, England




Wife Elizabeth /BERRY/ 1

           Born: 1534 - Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1588
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         Father: James /BURY/ (1502-1558) 1
         Mother: Elizabeth Ann /LOVETT/ (Abt 1510-Bef 1558) 1





Children
1 M Sir Edmund /HARWELL/ 1

           Born: 1567 - Besford, Worcester, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1614
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         Spouse: Elizabeth /GRIFFITH/ (1570-      ) 1
           Marr: Abt 1588 - England




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George /KNOTT/ and Elizabeth /BERRY/




Husband George /KNOTT/

           Born: Abt 1589 - , Northumberland, Virginia
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Wife Elizabeth /BERRY/

           Born: Abt 1593 - , Northumberland, Virginia
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1 F Anne /KNOTT/

           Born: Abt 1615 - , Northumberland, Virginia
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         Spouse: Henry /MOSLEY/ (1615-1655)
           Marr: Abt 1647 - , Northumberland, Virginia




Notes: Marriage

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Littleton /MARTIN/ and Estelle /BERRY/




Husband Littleton /MARTIN/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Estelle /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: George Huiet /BERRY/ (1870-1904)
         Mother: Katie /BERRY/ (1878-1974)





Children

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George Huiet /BERRY/ and Katie /BERRY/




Husband George Huiet /BERRY/

           Born: 26 Jan 1870
     Christened: 
           Died: 4 Oct 1904
         Buried:  - Bethany Methodist Church Cem., Saluda, South Carolina


         Father: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908)
         Mother: Isabella /JENNINGS/ (1852-1930)


       Marriage: 24 Oct 1895




Wife Katie /BERRY/

           Born: 1 Dec 1878
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Mar 1974
         Buried:  - Bethany Methodist Church Cem., Saluda, South Carolina

   Other Spouse: Tom Bacon /BERRY/ (1880-1953) - 31 May 1911



Children
1 F Estelle /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Littleton /MARTIN/ (living)



2 M Clarence Roland /BERRY/

           Born: 27 Mar 1899
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           Died: Nov 1983 - Saluda, Saluda, South Carolina
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         Spouse: Dorothy /DUFFIE/ (1906-1992)
           Marr: 25 Sep 1925



3 F Edna /BERRY/

           Born: 18 Feb 1902
     Christened: 
           Died: 9 Jan 1996 - Saluda, Saluda, South Carolina
         Buried: 
         Spouse: James Winfield /COLEMAN/ (living)



4 F Georgie Huiet /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Thurmond Padgett /JONES/ (living)




Notes: Marriage

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Thurmond Padgett /JONES/ and Georgie Huiet /BERRY/




Husband Thurmond Padgett /JONES/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Georgie Huiet /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: George Huiet /BERRY/ (1870-1904)
         Mother: Katie /BERRY/ (1878-1974)





Children

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Hugh Wilson /BERRY/ and Evelyn /YATES/




Husband Hugh Wilson /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Tom Bacon /BERRY/ (1880-1953)
         Mother: Katie /BERRY/ (1878-1974)


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Wife Evelyn /YATES/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Children

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John /BERRY/ and Isabella /JENNINGS/




Husband John /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Isabella /JENNINGS/

           Born: 15 May 1852 - Edgefield District, South Carolina
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           Died: 23 Jun 1930
         Buried:  - Bethany Methodist Church Cem., Saluda, South Carolina


         Father: Sampson /JENNINGS/ (1827-1855)
         Mother: Keren Happuch /MERCHANT/ (1821-1909)



   Other Spouse: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908) - 11 Mar 1869



Children

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John Davis /BERRY/ and Mattie /BERRY/




Husband John Davis /BERRY/

           Born: 18 Sep 1874 - Saluda , South Carolina
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           Died: 15 Oct 1916
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         Father: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908)
         Mother: Isabella /JENNINGS/ (1852-1930)


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Wife Mattie /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Children

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Tom Bacon /BERRY/ and Katie /BERRY/




Husband Tom Bacon /BERRY/

           Born: 22 Nov 1880 - Saluda , South Carolina
     Christened: 
           Died: 18 Feb 1953
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         Father: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908)
         Mother: Isabella /JENNINGS/ (1852-1930)


       Marriage: 31 May 1911




Wife Katie /BERRY/

           Born: 1 Dec 1878
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Mar 1974
         Buried:  - Bethany Methodist Church Cem., Saluda, South Carolina

   Other Spouse: George Huiet /BERRY/ (1870-1904) - 24 Oct 1895



Children
1 M Thomas Roy /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Lucille /HOWLE/ (living)



2 M Hugh Wilson /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Evelyn /YATES/ (living)




Notes: Marriage

2 _PREF Y
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Willis Daniel /BERRY/ and Martha Elliet "Ella" /BERRY/




Husband Willis Daniel /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Martha Elliet "Ella" /BERRY/

           Born: 12 Feb 1872 - Saluda , South Carolina
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           Died: 11 Aug 1940
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         Father: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908)
         Mother: Isabella /JENNINGS/ (1852-1930)





Children

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Matt Wilson /BERRY/ and Katie /SWINDLER/




Husband Matt Wilson /BERRY/

           Born: 18 Aug 1876 - Saluda , South Carolina
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           Died: 24 Jun 1969
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         Father: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908)
         Mother: Isabella /JENNINGS/ (1852-1930)


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Wife Katie /SWINDLER/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Dan Barnes /BLEDSOE/ and Maybelle /BERRY/




Husband Dan Barnes /BLEDSOE/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Maybelle /BERRY/

           Born: 9 May 1886 - Saluda , South Carolina
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           Died: 14 Sep 1966
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         Father: Daniel Wilson /BERRY/ (1835-1908)
         Mother: Isabella /JENNINGS/ (1852-1930)





Children

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Phillip /JOHNSON/ and Sarai /BERRY/




Husband Phillip /JOHNSON/ 1

           Born: Between 1535 and 1540 - Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England
     Christened: 
           Died:  - London, Middlesex, England
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 27 Apr 1579 - Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England




Wife Sarai /BERRY/ 1

           Born: 1549 - Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England
     Christened: 
           Died:  - London, Middlesex, England
         Buried: 



Children
1 F Susan /JOHNSON/ 1

           Born: 1581 - Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1633 - Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Christopher /JACKSON/ (1575-1633) 1
           Marr: 20 Oct 1602 - Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England




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Thomas Roy /BERRY/ and Lucille /HOWLE/




Husband Thomas Roy /BERRY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Tom Bacon /BERRY/ (1880-1953)
         Mother: Katie /BERRY/ (1878-1974)


       Marriage: 




Wife Lucille /HOWLE/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Children

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James Thomas /WOOTEN/ and Betty Jean /BERRYFIELD/




Husband James Thomas /WOOTEN/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Betty Jean /BERRYFIELD/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 F Shirley Jean /WOOTEN/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Claude Willis /BILLINGS/ (1938-1993)
         Spouse: /KELLY/ (living)




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/UNSWORTH/ and /BERRYHILL/




Husband /UNSWORTH/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife /BERRYHILL/ (details suppressed for this person)

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1 F /UNSWORTH/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: /MOORE/ Jr. (living)




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/BERRYMAN/ III and /FAIRLEY/




Husband /BERRYMAN/ III (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife /FAIRLEY/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: /FAIRLEY/ Jr.
         Mother: /LUMBLEY/





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1 M /BERRYMAN/ IV (details suppressed for this person)

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2 M /BERRYMAN/ (details suppressed for this person)

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M. J. L. /McMACKINS/ and F. L. /BERRYMAN/




Husband M. J. L. /McMACKINS/ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: /McMACKINS/
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Wife F. L. /BERRYMAN/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Henry Thomas /BERRYMAN/ Sr. and Rebecca Jane /TUMMINS/




Husband Henry Thomas /BERRYMAN/ Sr. (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Rebecca Jane /TUMMINS/ (details suppressed for this person)

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Children
1 F Laura Belle /BERRYMAN/

           Born: 23 Sep 1876 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jan 1947 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
         Buried: 
         Spouse: William Calvin /SMITH/ (1878-      )



2 M Henry Thomas /BERRYMAN/ Jr. (details suppressed for this person)

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William Calvin /SMITH/ and Laura Belle /BERRYMAN/




Husband William Calvin /SMITH/

           Born: Mar 1878 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
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           Died: 
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         Father: John Marshall /SMITH/ (1851-1919)
         Mother: Ida Penelope /JAMES/ (1856-1894)


       Marriage: 




Wife Laura Belle /BERRYMAN/

           Born: 23 Sep 1876 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 Jan 1947 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry Thomas /BERRYMAN/ Sr.
         Mother: Rebecca Jane /TUMMINS/





Children
1 M Arthur Leroy /SMITH/

           Born: 10 Apr 1898 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Feb 1971 - , Davidson, Tennessee
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Nettie Jewell /BAKER/ (1899-1984)



2 M Marlin /SMITH/ (details suppressed for this person)

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3 M Raymond Kender /SMITH/

           Born: 2 Sep 1902 - , Humphreys, Tennessee
     Christened: 
           Died: 1971
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Etta /GREER/ (living)



4 F Gussie Mildred /SMITH/ (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
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         Spouse: Walter /OWENS/ (living)



5 F William Calvin /SMITH/ Jr. (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: James William /HOBBS/ (living)



6 U /SMITH/ (details suppressed for this person)

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General Notes: Child - Arthur Leroy /SMITH/

Handed down to Patricia Powers from Miss Gladys Berryman, aunt to Patricia's husband. that Arthur played fiddle and both him and his wife sang at the Grand Ole Opry along with some of their children.

http://www.cmt.com/artists/az/smith_fiddlinand_arthur/bio.jhtml
Fiddlin' Arthur Smith Biography
There are many, many people named Arthur Smith in the world. There are at least two famous Arthur Smiths in country music, and each of them seem to have decided to use their instrument to identify themselves. So besides Fiddlin' Arthur Smith there is also Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith. And if one really wants to get Smith-happy, there is also a famous banjo builder, Arthur E. Smith. But let's say one was hanging out in the corner of Tennessee formed by the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers. In that case, there would be one and only one Arthur Smith of any note, and that would be the one who fiddled. He was called the "king of the fiddlers" in this neck of the woods, and literally all one has to do is go for a drive to be reminded of it. One can hum "Chittlin' Cookin' Time in Cheatham County" while driving through Cheatham County; likewise Smith has documented "Dickson County Blues," "Indian Creek," "Sugar Tree Stomp." Oh, and Smith's "Paris Waltz" was hardly written while he chomped on a baguette. That's Paris, TN, the little town across the river. Smith is the giant of fiddle in the Tennessee valley, certainly one of the most influential fiddlers from the old-time school whose tunes, approach, and innovation continued to be copied by progressive bluegrass players decades later. He played professionally for nearly a half of a century, with only a few lulls in his career. Smith was born on a family farm and had no formal education beyond fifth grade. As was common in this time in the Tennessee hills he married quite young, just after the outbreak of World War I. Smith was 16, his bride Nettie was only 15. Already music was a big part of his life, although researchers have been unable to pinpoint exactly when he started playing. As a youngster he was already a fiddler, and good enough to work in some local bands, mostly playing dances. His wife played guitar in one of these groups. Nettie Smith recalled selling chickens to buy her husband a fiddle. The original price of this instrument was six dollars and 50 cents, and decades later it would be worth at least 100 times that much. The neighbor who sold this instrument was the appropriately named fiddler Grady Stringer, who would have to have been the first main influence on Smith as a musician. Another early influence was the fiddler Walter Warden, whose tunes are still part of the old-time repertoire. Smith continued performing in the area, working with his wife, his cousin Homer Smith, and a fiddler named Floyd Ethredge who went on to work with the early Grand Ole Opry stars the Crook Brothers. In 1921 Smith moved to Dickson and began a railroad career, first as a logger and then later a linesman. The job involved travel back and forth across the state. Smith would pack his fiddle and pick up music from people he met along the way. One of these musicians that recalls Smith from this time was Jack Jackson, the first country artist to record in Nashville. This era was the very beginning of that city's life as the world's country & western music capital. The radio station WDAD at first wouldn't touch country music, finding it undignified. That was until a fellow named George D. Hay was hired as station manager, and the wealthy Henry Ford decided to promote fiddle contests to "preserve authentic American values." This is where Smith could step in, as he was already winning fiddle contests across Tennessee. Smith's first appearance on the Opry was on December 23, 1927, for a 30-minute solo fiddle set. At this stage of his career he was not singing, but just played unaccompanied fiddle in the style of so many rural players. His cousin Homer re-joined Smith after several weeks on the Opry. The two of them wound up appearing on the show 28 times that year, more than any other act except the harmonica player DeFord Bailey </artists/az/bailey_deford/artist.jhtml>. Nonetheless, he carried on with the railroad job, as nobody could have survived on the Opry wages of five dollars per man per show, regardless of how much farther a buck might have gone back then. But the travel in and out of Nashville definitely had an effect on Smith's ability to be in the right place at the right time to score a recording date with companies that were actively documenting the work of fiddlers, many of whom were much less popular than Smith. Smith and his cousin split up their relationship in the early '30s, and a new band called the Dixieliners was formed with the very talented brothers Kirk and Sam McGee. In many ways this was one of the first supergroups, putting together three virtuoso string players. The three players all had a great deal of repertoire in common, all were in their mid-'30s, ambitious, determined, and energetic. It was, in short, a great match. It was in this combination that Smith began singing, an event about which Kirk McGee recalled, "Once he finally got to singing, and then we couldn't stop him." For the most part the group divided up chores thusly: Smith did the fiddling, Sam did the comedy, and Kirk and Sam did the vocals. A pianist was added to the group in due course, and Smith looked no farther than his daughter Lavonne Smith, who began to tour with the Dixieliners while still a high school student, picking up her five-dollar pay at the Opry like the rest of the country greats. Fans of dissonant country music have spent lifetimes searching for a tape of an early broadcast by this band in which Lavonne was so startled by a steam whistle being blown on stage that she pounded out a harsh chord in the style of avant-jazz pianist Cecil Taylor. This didn't make Smith very happy. "It was a goof, and Daddy didn't like goofs," she said. The Dixieliners became more and more professional through the Opry, the sponsorship of a glue company, and the hiring of an all-purpose booker, manager, and advance man. The group toured through the region, playing in many small communities. Sometimes they would be part of a larger Grand Ole Opry package tour that would feature performers such as Uncle Dave Macon </artists/az/macon_uncle_dave/artist.jhtml>. Some of these tours also involved the famous Delmore Brothers </artists/az/delmore_brothers/artist.jhtml>. Smith was working with both groups in various combinations through about 1934, then began working with the Delmores </artists/az/delmore_brothers/artist.jhtml> exclusively, and it was with this combination that he finally began recording a series of sides for the Gennet label. The first sessions were done in New Orleans, and it included two tunes that came to be known as Smith classics, "Blackberry Blossom" and "Red Apple Rag." On sessions for Victor the next year, Smith once again opened his mouth and recorded some vocal numbers, and according to Alton Delmore it was a matter of economics, not choice as the record label felt instrumental music wasn't going to sell. The first Smith vocal hit went on to become another standard repertoire number, as do so many country tunes that have such a basic philosophy included right in the title: "There's More Pretty Girls Than One." More than five sessions were cut with the Delmores </artists/az/delmore_brothers/artist.jhtml> in the next few years, the tracks coming out under the name of the Arthur Smith Trio rather than the Dixieliners, although later album reissues on County reverted back to the Dixieliners name. Listeners of the time would have no idea whether a new record was a Smith feature or a Delmore Brothers </artists/az/delmore_brothers/artist.jhtml> cut, so completely had their styles meshed. Corrupt business practices also added to the confusion, as the guys would sometimes cut a song for one label under Smith's name, then redo it for a competing label as the Delmore Brothers </artists/az/delmore_brothers/artist.jhtml>. More than 50 different songs were cut during this period, the most famous of the batch being Smith's song "Beautiful Brown Eyes," which would later lead to court action when the artists behind a cover version decided the song was in the public domain. Fiddle contests continued to be popular in these years, with promoters presenting bigger and bigger showdowns between fiddlers such as Curly Fox, Clark Kessenger, Clayton McMichen, and the native American fiddler Natchee the Indian. These players were all so hot it was often impossible to choose a winner, unless one of them happened to have organized the contest in which case he would sometimes present the first-place prize to himself. The railroad job was taking a back seat to touring, and sometimes the music on tour was taking a back seat to hard drinking. Smith fell in with a bunch of rowdies at a 1938 fiddle contest and didn't even show up to square off against a team of fiddlers that included the sponsor, a local sherrif. The lawman was so upset with the Smith no-show he tried to have him arrested. It did lead to an Opry suspension, and as was often the case this momentary vacancy helped someone else get his foot in the door, in this case a little curly-haired singer named Roy Acuff </artists/az/acuff_roy/artist.jhtml>. In the late '30s Smith was hired by the Tennessee Valley Boys, a young band on the rise that needed a well-known, senior statesman on fiddle out front. By 1939 this band included three fiddlers: Smith, the young Howdy Forrester, and Georgia Slim Rutland. In 1940 Smith moved to Shreveport, LA, to join the Shelton Brothers on radio station KWKH. This job didn't keep Smith's interest and after roaming around the Gulf Coast he rejoined Lavonne in Decatur, AL, putting together a local radio band that somehow ended up consisting of players that all had the first name "Arthur," except of course for Lavonne. But unsure of how well the Band of Arthurs would fare on a 1940 recording date, Smith instead threw together a collaboration with the young Bill Monroe </artists/az/monroe_bill/artist.jhtml>. This session was in many ways historic. It was the first recording Monroe would do and the last of Smith's Bluebird sessions. In the early 40s, as the world's attention was focused more and more on tragic events in Europe, Smith joined the Bailes Brothers </artists/az/bailes_brothers/artist.jhtml> in West Virginia. He had several featured solos with this show, and is credited with helping to popularize the song "Orange Blossom Special" as a feature for fiddlers. In 1943 Smith began emphasizing his singing and songwriting, and published two important songbooks, Songs From the Hills of Tennesse and Arthur Smith's Original Song Folio No. 1. Smith continued working with different groups during the '40s including a duo with his son Ernest Smith and a backup stint with the cowboy singer Rex Griffin. His flair backing up the increasingly popular western style of music led to gigs with Jimmy Wakely, a former backup singer to cowboy star Gene Autry </artists/az/autry_gene/artist.jhtml>. Smith rode this horse ride into Hollywood, where he wound up appearing with Wakely </artists/az/wakely_jimmy/artist.jhtml>'s band in a series of low-budget Monogram oaters such as Oklahoma Blues. But a cowboy Smith was not, and luckily his bowing arm wasn't injured when one director made the mistake of putting the fiddler on top of a horse without first attaching him to the saddle with a strong adhesive bond. His recording career continued while on the West coast, leading to a contract with Capitol, where he recorded "Orange Blossom Special" "Crazy Blues" and other successful numbers. For the first time he ran abreast of the North Carolina guitar picker with the same name, and the sides were released as The Original Arthur Smith and His Dixieliners to avoid confusion with the Guitar Boogie man. The next decade would be the low point of Smith's career. After backing several country singers including Billy Walker </artists/az/walker_billy/artist.jhtml>, he wound up in Nashville working as a carpenter rather than as a musician, a development that can be partially blamed on Smith's alcoholism, although its significance as a symbol of that city's cultural backwardness shouldn't be downplayed. In the middle of this low period, Smith had the pleasure of hearing Roy Acuff </artists/az/acuff_roy/artist.jhtml> singing "Beautiful Brown Eyes," no doubt while he was sawing a board on some job. The song became so popular that there were scores of cover versions, but everyone followed Acuff </artists/az/acuff_roy/artist.jhtml>'s lead and declared the song "public domain," despite it having appeared in a published Smith song folio in 1943. Smith won the suit but it was settled for a lump sum rather than any actual account of royalties. By the mid-'50s rock & roll was on everyone's mind and it seemed a nadir for old-time music. But by 1956 Smith had been invited back to the west coast by Wakeley, where he struck up a new collaboration with the famous country guitarist Merle Travis </artists/az/travis_merle/artist.jhtml>. In the meantime a new folk revival had begun with groups such as the New Lost City Ramblers, whose member Mike Seeger was combing the hinterlands looking for authentic old-time musicians to research and document. His efforts led to combining Smith with his old pals the McGee brothers for a 1957 recording session held in Kirk's livingroom. Seeger was originally unsatisfied with the results, released one album, and then held onto the outtakes for nearly eight years, hoping a new session could be arranged. Finally the balance of the material was released. Fans of old-time music find this reunion of old friends, playing casually and with growing excitement at every tune, to be one of the finest recordings ever done in this genre. Another helpful development during this time was the interest in Smith's music coming from the modern bluegrass camp, as Flatt and Scruggs </artists/az/flatt_and_scruggs/artist.jhtml>' fiddler Paul Warren began introducing a whole series of features based on Smith's material into the act. More work for the Opry old timers turned up in 1963 with the Starday label inaugurated a series of releases devoted to this music. The Smith album Rare Old Time Fiddle Tunes </artists/az/smith_fiddlinand_arthur/494507/album.jhtml> features fiddle accompanied only by son Ernest on guitar, and is considered another of Smith's masterpieces. Seeger issued invitations for Smith and the McGees to join the new folk circuit including appearances at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, where they received a thunderous ovation. The mainstream audience attraction for this type of music was shortlived, though, and Smith wound up in his later years travelling on the same old rural circuit that he had started out in, frequently performing for old friends who would go to trouble to record the event because they sensed Smith was on his way out. He made his last appearance in 1969 in Louisville in a group with Sleepy Marlin and Tommy Riggs. He was buried near McEwen, TN, just a few miles from where he had first learned to fiddle a tune. His music remains so strongly remembered, and completely influenced so much of the country fiddling that came after it, that it seems no exaggeration to say that he lives on in a form more like a part of the landscape than the legend of a man. ~ Eugene Chadbourne, All Music Guide
picture

Walter Andrew III /FULLER/ and Lee Anne /BERRYMAN/




Husband Walter Andrew III /FULLER/ (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Walter Andrew /FULLER/ Jr.
         Mother: Jean Alden /PORTER/ (1930-1987)


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Lyn Marie /VARVARO/

   Other Spouse: Tina Kay /CARVER/




Wife Lee Anne /BERRYMAN/ (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children

picture
Abraham /BERTOLET/ and Esther /DETURCK/




Husband Abraham /BERTOLET/ 2

           Born: 12 Dec 1712 - ChateauD'Oex, Berne, Switzerland 3 4
     Christened: 
           Died: Jul 1766 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 5
         Buried: 


         Father: Jean /BERTOLET/ (Abt 1687-1754) 3
         Mother: Susanna /HARCOURT/ (After 1690-1757) 3


       Marriage: 1735 - Pennsylvania 3

Noted events in his life were:
1. Immigration 3, 1726 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania




Wife Esther /DETURCK/ 1 2

           Born: 29 Sep 1710 - Esopus, Duchess, New York 3
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 May 1798 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania
         Buried: 


         Father: Isaac /DETURCK/ (1685-1721) 1 3
         Mother: Anna Maria /HARCOURT/ (1687-1761) 3



Noted events in her life were:
1. Baptism 3, 29 Apr 1712 - Pennsylvania



Children
1 F Mary (Maria) /BERTOLET/ 2

           Born: 18 Sep 1736 - OleyTwp, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 3 6
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Jul 1802 - Berks, Pennsylvania 6
         Buried:  - HochPrivate Cemetery #2  **chane Me**
         Spouse: Daniel /HOCH/ (1730/1731-1789) 2
           Marr: 1755 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 3




General Notes: Child - Mary (Maria) /BERTOLET/

Place is assumed.

Probate Records of Berks County, Index to Administration Letters -- Mary Hoch, 1802, volume 6, page 73, Administrator: Peter Rapp.
picture

Jean /BERTOLET/ and Susanna /HARCOURT/




Husband Jean /BERTOLET/ 3

           Born: Abt 1687 - ChateauD'Oex, Berne, Switzerland 7
     Christened: 
           Died: 1754 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 7
         Buried: 1754 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania


         Father: Jean /BERTOLET/ (Between 1660/1665-Between 1710/1725) 3
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 2 Feb 1712 - Mulhausen, Rhineland-Pfalz, Germany 3 8

Noted events in his life were:
1. Immigration, 1726 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania




Wife Susanna /HARCOURT/ 3

           Born: After 1690 - Mulhausen, Rhineland-Pfalz, Germany 9
     Christened: 
           Died: 1757 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania
         Buried: 


         Father: Jean /D'HERICOURT/ (After 1661-Between 1711/1725) 1 3
         Mother: 



Noted events in her life were:
1. Immigration, 1726 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania



Children
1 M Abraham /BERTOLET/ 2

           Born: 12 Dec 1712 - ChateauD'Oex, Berne, Switzerland 3 4
     Christened: 
           Died: Jul 1766 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 5
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Esther /DETURCK/ (1710-1798) 1 2
           Marr: 1735 - Pennsylvania 3




General Notes: Husband - Jean /BERTOLET/

From:
ANNALS OF THE OLEY VALLEY The Bertolet Family

If one would consult the directory of the city of Reading, he would find a long list of BERTOLET, or BERTOLETTE, names, most of which (possibly all) rep- resent some worthy personage, many of them men and women in the front rank of the professional and business classes, especially among the legal and medical professions, of whom Reading should not be ashamed. If one could consult Uncle Sam's complete mailing list, he would find many more of the same name scattered over the expansive domain of his 48 states. A few of the same family are still to be found in the Oley Valley and nearby townships of Berks. But if they were all to go back from the twigs and branches and out-stretching arms of lineage, and trace their way to the original American stem, they would nearly all come to the same progenitor, Jean BERTOLET, of Chateau D'Oex, in Switzerland, later Minfeld, Germany, who landed in Oley in the fall of 1726, now almost 200 years ago. Only a few descended from an earlier arrival, Jean's brother, Peter, who settled in Oley in 1720. A river has many streams, many sources, many hidden springs far back in the hills and meadows of the interior that make its life, while a genealogical cluster of streams always trace their origin to one spring, though an individual personality is, in this respect, like a river. It gets its blood from many sources. As it is traced backward through the generations it multiplies and increases in geometrical progression. So a family name is like a tree, rather than a river, tracing its origin from a single stem or seed, while an individual life is like a river, having its sources in many springs.

The BERTOLETs of America, and collateral families by intermarriage, as far as is known, all originate from Oley, where Jean and Peter BERTOLET, their progenitors, religious Huguenots and fugitives, whose father was driven out of the ancient family home and habitat of northwestern France by the cruel scourge of religious persecution, found a resting place, like Noah's dove, in Oley, with the green twig of godly love and peace in their hearts, 200 and 206 years ago. It was the beginning of new, prosperous, happy divinely-blest family-life that has come down now for six and seven generations with old family virtues, enterprising initiations, religious and patriotic fervor, and educational torch-bearing to the present day, to bless not only the Oley Valley all these years, but to prove itself an uplifting factor in many a community besides. My, if this American family tree were stoutly shaken today, what a harvest of ripe fruit would tumble into Uncle Sam's wide-spreading apron! And since "the tree is known by its fruit", according the greatest teacher of all time, and according to an old German adage, "der Apfel fallt nicht weit vom Stamm" (an apple does not drop far from its stem), we 'e are especially interested in this American family stem. (We shall confine ourselves to Jean alone.)

JEAN BERTOLET. That Jean BERTOLET was a man of the most excellent qualities of mind and heart, may be gathered from his passport to America, still pre- served, and given him by the official board of his last town district on the eve of his emigration to this country in 1726, which says (translated into English):

"We, the undersigned High Bailiff of the Church of the Illustrious Count Palatinate of Guttenberg, attest herewith in virtue of this letter that the bearer hereof, the worthy, well-reputed and discreet Jean BERTOLET, born at Chateau D'Oex, in Switzerland, in the District of Berne, with his wife, has for 14 years resided constantly in this place, as occupants of the adjoining farm belonging to the August Chapter of Seltz, conducted him self piously, honorably, uprightly and justly, and in such a manner as becomes an honest man of laudable conduct, so that we of him as well as of his wife, cannot other- wise speak thus to their honor and praise".

"Inasmuch as this couple with their five children, under the hope of improving their best interests and opportunities, desire to remove themselves to the new country of Pennsylvania, there to settle themselves peaceably, and are wholly resolved and determined upon the same: Therefore, we, obedient to our numerous duties and station and service, respectfully, and in a friendly manner, solicit and request for the aforesaid Jean BERTOLET and his wife, Susanna, and their five children, not only that they may pass all places free and without hindrance, but besides, on account of their respectable conduct, that there be extended to them every desired aid and assistance".
"To such are we on similar occasions in the mostly friendly manner ready and willing to reciprocate the kindness".
"To this we, besides our subscribed names, append our usual seal".
"So given and done in the Upper Official District of Minnefeldten, the twenty-sixth day of the month of April as men enumerate, one thousand seven hundred and twenty-six".
J.C. WIMPFFEN, Nicholas SCHOENLAUB, Councillor, Hans EHRHART BEYER, Clerk of the Court. (Seal)".

HIS MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE. This doubtless anxious and anticipant family left the picturesque surroundings of their old home to find what was then a rich valley, equally picturesque, but as yet sparsely settled and still sur- rounded by the Indians. In a visit which Samuel E BERTOLET, attorney of Reading, a lineal descen- dant of this American progenitor of the seventh generation, made to the BERTO- LET haunts of the old world, in France, Switzerland and Germany in 1913, he was enabled to bring valuable information concerning the family to light, a- mong which was the unearthing of this progenitor's marriage certificate:

"Married: On Feb. 2, 1712, after three announcements in the church at Barbebroth, Jean BERTOLET, son of Jean BERTOLET, late of Chateau D'Oex, with Susanna, daughter of Jean HARCOURT, of Muhlhofen. Certified to at Barbebroth, 17 September 1913. WAMBSGANS, Minister".

This Susanna HARCOURT was a sister of Marie HARCOURT DeTURCK, wife of Isaac DeTURCK, whose letter we have quoted in Chapter 1. and who had come to America at least a number of years earlier.

The five children, mentioned in the passport, and whom the parents brought along to their Oley home, were as follows: Abraham, Maria, Jean, Esther, and Susanna. To these were added in their new home, Frederick and Peter. These children were in time to establish homes of their own and perpetuate the name and virtues of their parents in this new country opening up around them. They had settled in the heart of the Oley Valley, at a choice spot on his land, erected in 1731 "one of the most substantial houses in Oley". Here his family was reared and in due time married and became heads of households that have been well connected and conspicuous for nobility and progress. An old Latin family Bible, printed in Geneva in 1567, still preserved and in the possession of Sarah BERTOLET, of Oley, holds the following interesting record:

"Susanna BERTOLET: The Lord has enriched her with His good and Holy Spirit, so that she may grow in His fear and love in order that every day of her life she may be agreeable to Thee, her Creator, by being humble and patient to His will. Amen"!

"Abraham BERTOLET, ist geboren December 11, 1712; Maria BERTOLET, ist ge- boren July 12, 1715; Jean BERTOLET, ist geborne September 28, 1717; Esther BERTOLET, ist geboren August 12, 1720, married Or George DeBENNEVILLE, emi- grant; Susanna BERTOLET, ist geboren November 17, 1724".

Those not recorded in the Bible are Frederick BERTOLET, born in Oley, 1726 or 1727; Peter BERTOLET, born 1728, died September 2, 1744, at Bethlehem, and buried in Moravian Cemetery.

HIS DEATH. Jean BERTOLET died in 1757, aged 70 years, and was buried in the family burial plot on the old homestead farm near Oley Line, and only com- paratively lately has the BERTOLET Family Association placed a fitting tomb- stone, suitably inscribed, over his ashes. His wife in due time followed him in death, and the old homestead reverted by purchase to Frederick on April 4, 1757.

Through the marriage of the children more branches of the family began their outspreading ramifications, which today, if all were living, would compose a town of a few thousand inhabitants.

Abraham married in 1735 Esther DeTURCK, a daughter of Isaac DeTURCK, and settled on a portion of the original DeTURCK farm, which has ever since re- mained in the BERTOLET family hands, now the property of Israel M BERTOLET, an octogenarian, of Reading, and direct descendant of Abraham. This branch of the family is intermarried with the HOCHs, YODERs, KERSTs, DeTURCKs, FREYs, and their descent into other families, and so on until the sixth generation is reached. The same is true of the other five branches. They have grown out of the parent stem and then divided again and again for generations, like the branches of a mighty oak, subdivided into smaller branches and branchlets, twigs and buds.

We have in one branch alone hundreds of descendants and scores of different family names, but many having their first American beginnings in Oley. They include such names as KINSEY, GRIESEMER, GRIM, PLANK, EHST, HOFFMAN, BARD, LEFFLER, CLEAVER, PRICE, KAUFFMAN, WICK, MILLER, MAIZE, BADGER, MOSS, MYERS, HEILIG, SOMMERVILLE, DAVIS, McCRACKEN, KEEHN, LEVAN, SHERER, SPECHT, FLORY, DIEROLF, BERKHEIMER, KNECTH, ZIEGLER, ANTRIM, JORDAN, WISLER, BRUNNER, KURTZ, HEAKEL, ROSENBERRY, KUPPELBERGER, SNELL, HUNSBERGER, BENNER, NAREHOOD, FOX, WAGNER, HAMILTON, MARKLEY, GABEL, BUCHER, ZOLLERS, KLINE, BAUM, GARTNER, LEH- MAN, EGGELING, BUFFINGTON, KESSLER, LAPP, GRUBB, JOHNSON, LUDWIG, HALTEMAN, WILLAUER, HOFF, WISMER, FAGLEY, BICKEL, BERGEY, FUNK, STAUFFER, PIEHL, KULP, ERB, McMURTRIE, HILLEGAS, PORTER, DIEHL, DETWEILER, NYCE, STEARLY, KRATZ, CHASE, ROYER, SHEARER, McDONALD, JACK, NAGLE, HARTMAN, HINNERSHITZ, ESTERLY, LEWIS, QUELLIGAN, and SMITH. What a banyan out of but a single branch of the parent stem.

Maria BERTOLET, eldest daughter of the original Jean, was married to Stephen BARNET, a native of Schwoszingen, Germany, and had seven children by him, who in turn intermarried with the KIEFFERs and others, but of which branch of the family less is known, as recorded.

Jean (John) BERTOLET, the third child of American ancestor, was married to Catharine BALLY and had 13 children, intermarried with WEIN, FREY and oth- ers, who had a wide spreading descent, adding such names as HIGH, LEINBACH, MENSCH, FREY, BILLEN, LORAH, HALLOWAY, FREDERICKS, KLINE, STITZER, and others.

WIFE OF DeBENNEVILLE. Esther BERTOLET, fourth child and second daughter of Jean and Susanna deHARCOURT BERTOLET, and destined to lead a checkered and interesting life with her noted husband; for she married on February 24, 1745, a few months before the Rev Henry Melchior MUHLENBERG married Anna Maria WEI- SER, the daughter of the eminent Indian interpreter, Justice and Colonel Conrad WEISER, another illustrious and important character of Berks, Or George De- BENNEVILLE, whom her father had employed as teacher of his children. His career in Oley, and later at Germantown, was so conspicuous that he lifted all con- nected with him into the limelight of prominence. But his importance calls for an entire chapter to be devoted to him and his deeds alone.

The DeBENNEVILLEs had a family of children who were married to Jacob BRAUN (BROWN), John KEIM, John LIVINGTON, Elizabeth (COATS?),Dr Jonathan BERTOLET, a second cousin, and Eleanor ROBERTS, in the order of their age. In these families grew up men and women to add additional glory to both the parents' names. But more of this under the DeBENNEVILLE or KEIM chapters.

Susanna BERTOLET, third daughter of Jean and her namesake, mother BERTOLET, married Jacob FREY, of Frederick, Montgomery County, whose grandfather was first settler on the Delaware River, where they planted their home to become a savor of life and uplift to the community, through their children continued down to the present generation, who added new and lustrous stars to the family name. They had seven children, who married into BERTOLET, SCHLICHTER, HARTZ, TYSON, AND DETWEILER families.

Frederick BERTOLET, sixth in Jean and Susanna BERTOLET's family, and first to be born in Oley, married Esther LEVAN, daughter of Abraham and Catharine VON WEIMER LEVAN, another refugee Huguenot family of France, who had settled in Oley. He remained on the old homestead until his death in 1769, then was succeeded by his eldest son, John, as farmer, and here his mother also ended her days, having survived the father by some years. They had several children, who by marriage added such family names to theirs as ALSTADT, BECHTEL, REESER, and KERSHNER, through whose descent have come many noted county names, such as FOX and SHARTLE, RADER, etc., into the family register.
Peter BERTOLET, youngest son of Jean and Susanna, as has already been shown, died single, at the age of 16 years, doubtless as a Moravian student at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

PETER BERTOLET BRANCH. Through the first American ancestor's brother, Peter BERTOLET, another less numerous and, in Berks, less conspicuous branch of the family, has added many noble characters to the American BERTOLET family name. Though Peter also first settled in Oley, and it would seem six years before Jean, his homestead soon went in the Jonathan HERBEIN possession, most of this branch got scattered early and their deeds do not exactly belong to the annals of the Oley Valley.

INTENSELY RELIGIOUS. Jean BERTOLET was an intensely religious man. It was religious conviction that made men strong, positive, martyrs in his day. They were willing for it and Christ's sake to suffer persecution, to endure imprisonments, to forsake father and mother if need be, home and native land, all but Christ and their convictions. This brought the BERTOLETs, DeTURCKs, LeVANs, DeBENNEVILLEs, and many other Huguenots from France in slow stages or several relays, to Oley. We have already seen that this pioneer brought his wife and five children with him to America. But he brought more. He brought his French Bible, printed by the Calvinists at Geneva, and he brought his firm faith in Christ and his Zwinglian or Calvinistic faith and his rock-bound conviction. He had no theological training, but he knew his Bible. He did not get his religious nourishment from any canned, or malted, or bottled hermetically and sanitarily-sealed container, as so many in our day do, but he went to the source of all of the milk of divine truth, the Bible. He got it first- handed, where the flourishing calf gets its nourishment, at the mother cow's reservoir of the pure, unadulterated article before its processes of malting, condensing or admixture of water or other essence could weaken it, and he flourished in the Lord's grace and truth and love. And this first-handed conviction, this independent method of religious research, seems to have been transmitted to not a few of his descendants, for we find them in many places standing out conspicuously as religious leaders, even if but laymen, and builders of churches, Moravian, Mennonite, Evangelical, or supporters of whatever cult that is genuine, aggressive, sincerely tinctured with Bible truth and grace.

Thus it came that Jean BERTOLET consecrated his Oley house to God and opened it for the proclamation and promotion of true religion. In it preached ESH- BACH and Henry ANTES, Count ZINZENDORF, DeBENNEVILLE, and possibly WHITFIELD. Religion was the major topic of his day and life. It was spelled with a capital R. It took a dominant place in a man's thinking, acting and living. Those were not the days of coal or railroad strikes, income tax, World Court or Public Service Commission legislation, toll bridge, tariff or sesquicentennial discussions, or mammoth, many-sheeted newspapers, or picture shows and radio concerts, of institutes and club dinners, and baseball or football, hiking or golf clubs and games, no traffic questions, or prison reform, or almshouse problems, no prolonged discussions over the erection of a museum, city hall or courthouse to interrupt one in his thinking and practicing. About the only things to talk about were the training, feeding and clothing of one's family, religion and war. And our pioneers gave all of the 24 hours of a day they could spare from sleep (and they could get along on less sleep than we do, especially in the early morning), to these three things. And they usually mastered them. Their children were well fed on wholesome food and had rosy cheeks. They were well clad in linsey-woolsey and kept well and warm. They were well trained and hence were moral and clean and reverent. No over-crowded jails in that day. An open crime then shocked an entire community sick and pale.

Jean BERTOLET lived in that day and reared his family amid those environments. No wonder he transmitted such a stock of intelligent, sturdy, progressive, patriotic, and religious leaders in his progeny! He set them a pace, an example. He was prominent among the Moravian revivalists of his day, attended ZINZENDORF's conferences for the establishment of a Pennsylvania synod and furthered the enlightening teachings and religious cult of that wonderful pastor in his closing days, his own son-in-law, Or George DeBENNEVILLE. No wonder his descendants should arise and call him blessed and revere his memory and mark his resting place. He must have had a helpful and healing touch on his times as he casts his long shadow into our day of 200 years after.

Chateau D.Oex, Switzerland later became Minfeld, Germany

Buriedin the family graveyard at the Bertolet Homestead in Oley Twp.

John Bartolet paid taxes on 200 acres of land in 1734.


General Notes: Wife - Susanna /HARCOURT/

Please not e that she is younger than her sister Marie
picture

Jean /BERTOLET/




Husband Jean /BERTOLET/ 3

           Born: Between 1660 and 1665 - Switzerland
     Christened: 
           Died: Between 1710 and 1725 - ChateauD'Oex, Berne, Switzerland
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Jean /BERTOLET/ 3

           Born: Abt 1687 - ChateauD'Oex, Berne, Switzerland 7
     Christened: 
           Died: 1754 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 7
         Buried: 1754 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania
         Spouse: Susanna /HARCOURT/ (After 1690-1757) 3
           Marr: 2 Feb 1712 - Mulhausen, Rhineland-Pfalz, Germany 3 8




General Notes: Husband - Jean /BERTOLET/

The Bertolet family was of the French Nobility from Picardie. Bertholet 1470 was ennobled by warrant of the Frances-fief. Jean Bertolet of the vic de Conches and Breteuil was taxed there. They were Heugonauts.

Date and place are assumed.

Dates are estimated.


General Notes: Child - Jean /BERTOLET/

From:
ANNALS OF THE OLEY VALLEY The Bertolet Family

If one would consult the directory of the city of Reading, he would find a long list of BERTOLET, or BERTOLETTE, names, most of which (possibly all) rep- resent some worthy personage, many of them men and women in the front rank of the professional and business classes, especially among the legal and medical professions, of whom Reading should not be ashamed. If one could consult Uncle Sam's complete mailing list, he would find many more of the same name scattered over the expansive domain of his 48 states. A few of the same family are still to be found in the Oley Valley and nearby townships of Berks. But if they were all to go back from the twigs and branches and out-stretching arms of lineage, and trace their way to the original American stem, they would nearly all come to the same progenitor, Jean BERTOLET, of Chateau D'Oex, in Switzerland, later Minfeld, Germany, who landed in Oley in the fall of 1726, now almost 200 years ago. Only a few descended from an earlier arrival, Jean's brother, Peter, who settled in Oley in 1720. A river has many streams, many sources, many hidden springs far back in the hills and meadows of the interior that make its life, while a genealogical cluster of streams always trace their origin to one spring, though an individual personality is, in this respect, like a river. It gets its blood from many sources. As it is traced backward through the generations it multiplies and increases in geometrical progression. So a family name is like a tree, rather than a river, tracing its origin from a single stem or seed, while an individual life is like a river, having its sources in many springs.

The BERTOLETs of America, and collateral families by intermarriage, as far as is known, all originate from Oley, where Jean and Peter BERTOLET, their progenitors, religious Huguenots and fugitives, whose father was driven out of the ancient family home and habitat of northwestern France by the cruel scourge of religious persecution, found a resting place, like Noah's dove, in Oley, with the green twig of godly love and peace in their hearts, 200 and 206 years ago. It was the beginning of new, prosperous, happy divinely-blest family-life that has come down now for six and seven generations with old family virtues, enterprising initiations, religious and patriotic fervor, and educational torch-bearing to the present day, to bless not only the Oley Valley all these years, but to prove itself an uplifting factor in many a community besides. My, if this American family tree were stoutly shaken today, what a harvest of ripe fruit would tumble into Uncle Sam's wide-spreading apron! And since "the tree is known by its fruit", according the greatest teacher of all time, and according to an old German adage, "der Apfel fallt nicht weit vom Stamm" (an apple does not drop far from its stem), we 'e are especially interested in this American family stem. (We shall confine ourselves to Jean alone.)

JEAN BERTOLET. That Jean BERTOLET was a man of the most excellent qualities of mind and heart, may be gathered from his passport to America, still pre- served, and given him by the official board of his last town district on the eve of his emigration to this country in 1726, which says (translated into English):

"We, the undersigned High Bailiff of the Church of the Illustrious Count Palatinate of Guttenberg, attest herewith in virtue of this letter that the bearer hereof, the worthy, well-reputed and discreet Jean BERTOLET, born at Chateau D'Oex, in Switzerland, in the District of Berne, with his wife, has for 14 years resided constantly in this place, as occupants of the adjoining farm belonging to the August Chapter of Seltz, conducted him self piously, honorably, uprightly and justly, and in such a manner as becomes an honest man of laudable conduct, so that we of him as well as of his wife, cannot other- wise speak thus to their honor and praise".

"Inasmuch as this couple with their five children, under the hope of improving their best interests and opportunities, desire to remove themselves to the new country of Pennsylvania, there to settle themselves peaceably, and are wholly resolved and determined upon the same: Therefore, we, obedient to our numerous duties and station and service, respectfully, and in a friendly manner, solicit and request for the aforesaid Jean BERTOLET and his wife, Susanna, and their five children, not only that they may pass all places free and without hindrance, but besides, on account of their respectable conduct, that there be extended to them every desired aid and assistance".
"To such are we on similar occasions in the mostly friendly manner ready and willing to reciprocate the kindness".
"To this we, besides our subscribed names, append our usual seal".
"So given and done in the Upper Official District of Minnefeldten, the twenty-sixth day of the month of April as men enumerate, one thousand seven hundred and twenty-six".
J.C. WIMPFFEN, Nicholas SCHOENLAUB, Councillor, Hans EHRHART BEYER, Clerk of the Court. (Seal)".

HIS MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE. This doubtless anxious and anticipant family left the picturesque surroundings of their old home to find what was then a rich valley, equally picturesque, but as yet sparsely settled and still sur- rounded by the Indians. In a visit which Samuel E BERTOLET, attorney of Reading, a lineal descen- dant of this American progenitor of the seventh generation, made to the BERTO- LET haunts of the old world, in France, Switzerland and Germany in 1913, he was enabled to bring valuable information concerning the family to light, a- mong which was the unearthing of this progenitor's marriage certificate:

"Married: On Feb. 2, 1712, after three announcements in the church at Barbebroth, Jean BERTOLET, son of Jean BERTOLET, late of Chateau D'Oex, with Susanna, daughter of Jean HARCOURT, of Muhlhofen. Certified to at Barbebroth, 17 September 1913. WAMBSGANS, Minister".

This Susanna HARCOURT was a sister of Marie HARCOURT DeTURCK, wife of Isaac DeTURCK, whose letter we have quoted in Chapter 1. and who had come to America at least a number of years earlier.

The five children, mentioned in the passport, and whom the parents brought along to their Oley home, were as follows: Abraham, Maria, Jean, Esther, and Susanna. To these were added in their new home, Frederick and Peter. These children were in time to establish homes of their own and perpetuate the name and virtues of their parents in this new country opening up around them. They had settled in the heart of the Oley Valley, at a choice spot on his land, erected in 1731 "one of the most substantial houses in Oley". Here his family was reared and in due time married and became heads of households that have been well connected and conspicuous for nobility and progress. An old Latin family Bible, printed in Geneva in 1567, still preserved and in the possession of Sarah BERTOLET, of Oley, holds the following interesting record:

"Susanna BERTOLET: The Lord has enriched her with His good and Holy Spirit, so that she may grow in His fear and love in order that every day of her life she may be agreeable to Thee, her Creator, by being humble and patient to His will. Amen"!

"Abraham BERTOLET, ist geboren December 11, 1712; Maria BERTOLET, ist ge- boren July 12, 1715; Jean BERTOLET, ist geborne September 28, 1717; Esther BERTOLET, ist geboren August 12, 1720, married Or George DeBENNEVILLE, emi- grant; Susanna BERTOLET, ist geboren November 17, 1724".

Those not recorded in the Bible are Frederick BERTOLET, born in Oley, 1726 or 1727; Peter BERTOLET, born 1728, died September 2, 1744, at Bethlehem, and buried in Moravian Cemetery.

HIS DEATH. Jean BERTOLET died in 1757, aged 70 years, and was buried in the family burial plot on the old homestead farm near Oley Line, and only com- paratively lately has the BERTOLET Family Association placed a fitting tomb- stone, suitably inscribed, over his ashes. His wife in due time followed him in death, and the old homestead reverted by purchase to Frederick on April 4, 1757.

Through the marriage of the children more branches of the family began their outspreading ramifications, which today, if all were living, would compose a town of a few thousand inhabitants.

Abraham married in 1735 Esther DeTURCK, a daughter of Isaac DeTURCK, and settled on a portion of the original DeTURCK farm, which has ever since re- mained in the BERTOLET family hands, now the property of Israel M BERTOLET, an octogenarian, of Reading, and direct descendant of Abraham. This branch of the family is intermarried with the HOCHs, YODERs, KERSTs, DeTURCKs, FREYs, and their descent into other families, and so on until the sixth generation is reached. The same is true of the other five branches. They have grown out of the parent stem and then divided again and again for generations, like the branches of a mighty oak, subdivided into smaller branches and branchlets, twigs and buds.

We have in one branch alone hundreds of descendants and scores of different family names, but many having their first American beginnings in Oley. They include such names as KINSEY, GRIESEMER, GRIM, PLANK, EHST, HOFFMAN, BARD, LEFFLER, CLEAVER, PRICE, KAUFFMAN, WICK, MILLER, MAIZE, BADGER, MOSS, MYERS, HEILIG, SOMMERVILLE, DAVIS, McCRACKEN, KEEHN, LEVAN, SHERER, SPECHT, FLORY, DIEROLF, BERKHEIMER, KNECTH, ZIEGLER, ANTRIM, JORDAN, WISLER, BRUNNER, KURTZ, HEAKEL, ROSENBERRY, KUPPELBERGER, SNELL, HUNSBERGER, BENNER, NAREHOOD, FOX, WAGNER, HAMILTON, MARKLEY, GABEL, BUCHER, ZOLLERS, KLINE, BAUM, GARTNER, LEH- MAN, EGGELING, BUFFINGTON, KESSLER, LAPP, GRUBB, JOHNSON, LUDWIG, HALTEMAN, WILLAUER, HOFF, WISMER, FAGLEY, BICKEL, BERGEY, FUNK, STAUFFER, PIEHL, KULP, ERB, McMURTRIE, HILLEGAS, PORTER, DIEHL, DETWEILER, NYCE, STEARLY, KRATZ, CHASE, ROYER, SHEARER, McDONALD, JACK, NAGLE, HARTMAN, HINNERSHITZ, ESTERLY, LEWIS, QUELLIGAN, and SMITH. What a banyan out of but a single branch of the parent stem.

Maria BERTOLET, eldest daughter of the original Jean, was married to Stephen BARNET, a native of Schwoszingen, Germany, and had seven children by him, who in turn intermarried with the KIEFFERs and others, but of which branch of the family less is known, as recorded.

Jean (John) BERTOLET, the third child of American ancestor, was married to Catharine BALLY and had 13 children, intermarried with WEIN, FREY and oth- ers, who had a wide spreading descent, adding such names as HIGH, LEINBACH, MENSCH, FREY, BILLEN, LORAH, HALLOWAY, FREDERICKS, KLINE, STITZER, and others.

WIFE OF DeBENNEVILLE. Esther BERTOLET, fourth child and second daughter of Jean and Susanna deHARCOURT BERTOLET, and destined to lead a checkered and interesting life with her noted husband; for she married on February 24, 1745, a few months before the Rev Henry Melchior MUHLENBERG married Anna Maria WEI- SER, the daughter of the eminent Indian interpreter, Justice and Colonel Conrad WEISER, another illustrious and important character of Berks, Or George De- BENNEVILLE, whom her father had employed as teacher of his children. His career in Oley, and later at Germantown, was so conspicuous that he lifted all con- nected with him into the limelight of prominence. But his importance calls for an entire chapter to be devoted to him and his deeds alone.

The DeBENNEVILLEs had a family of children who were married to Jacob BRAUN (BROWN), John KEIM, John LIVINGTON, Elizabeth (COATS?),Dr Jonathan BERTOLET, a second cousin, and Eleanor ROBERTS, in the order of their age. In these families grew up men and women to add additional glory to both the parents' names. But more of this under the DeBENNEVILLE or KEIM chapters.

Susanna BERTOLET, third daughter of Jean and her namesake, mother BERTOLET, married Jacob FREY, of Frederick, Montgomery County, whose grandfather was first settler on the Delaware River, where they planted their home to become a savor of life and uplift to the community, through their children continued down to the present generation, who added new and lustrous stars to the family name. They had seven children, who married into BERTOLET, SCHLICHTER, HARTZ, TYSON, AND DETWEILER families.

Frederick BERTOLET, sixth in Jean and Susanna BERTOLET's family, and first to be born in Oley, married Esther LEVAN, daughter of Abraham and Catharine VON WEIMER LEVAN, another refugee Huguenot family of France, who had settled in Oley. He remained on the old homestead until his death in 1769, then was succeeded by his eldest son, John, as farmer, and here his mother also ended her days, having survived the father by some years. They had several children, who by marriage added such family names to theirs as ALSTADT, BECHTEL, REESER, and KERSHNER, through whose descent have come many noted county names, such as FOX and SHARTLE, RADER, etc., into the family register.
Peter BERTOLET, youngest son of Jean and Susanna, as has already been shown, died single, at the age of 16 years, doubtless as a Moravian student at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

PETER BERTOLET BRANCH. Through the first American ancestor's brother, Peter BERTOLET, another less numerous and, in Berks, less conspicuous branch of the family, has added many noble characters to the American BERTOLET family name. Though Peter also first settled in Oley, and it would seem six years before Jean, his homestead soon went in the Jonathan HERBEIN possession, most of this branch got scattered early and their deeds do not exactly belong to the annals of the Oley Valley.

INTENSELY RELIGIOUS. Jean BERTOLET was an intensely religious man. It was religious conviction that made men strong, positive, martyrs in his day. They were willing for it and Christ's sake to suffer persecution, to endure imprisonments, to forsake father and mother if need be, home and native land, all but Christ and their convictions. This brought the BERTOLETs, DeTURCKs, LeVANs, DeBENNEVILLEs, and many other Huguenots from France in slow stages or several relays, to Oley. We have already seen that this pioneer brought his wife and five children with him to America. But he brought more. He brought his French Bible, printed by the Calvinists at Geneva, and he brought his firm faith in Christ and his Zwinglian or Calvinistic faith and his rock-bound conviction. He had no theological training, but he knew his Bible. He did not get his religious nourishment from any canned, or malted, or bottled hermetically and sanitarily-sealed container, as so many in our day do, but he went to the source of all of the milk of divine truth, the Bible. He got it first- handed, where the flourishing calf gets its nourishment, at the mother cow's reservoir of the pure, unadulterated article before its processes of malting, condensing or admixture of water or other essence could weaken it, and he flourished in the Lord's grace and truth and love. And this first-handed conviction, this independent method of religious research, seems to have been transmitted to not a few of his descendants, for we find them in many places standing out conspicuously as religious leaders, even if but laymen, and builders of churches, Moravian, Mennonite, Evangelical, or supporters of whatever cult that is genuine, aggressive, sincerely tinctured with Bible truth and grace.

Thus it came that Jean BERTOLET consecrated his Oley house to God and opened it for the proclamation and promotion of true religion. In it preached ESH- BACH and Henry ANTES, Count ZINZENDORF, DeBENNEVILLE, and possibly WHITFIELD. Religion was the major topic of his day and life. It was spelled with a capital R. It took a dominant place in a man's thinking, acting and living. Those were not the days of coal or railroad strikes, income tax, World Court or Public Service Commission legislation, toll bridge, tariff or sesquicentennial discussions, or mammoth, many-sheeted newspapers, or picture shows and radio concerts, of institutes and club dinners, and baseball or football, hiking or golf clubs and games, no traffic questions, or prison reform, or almshouse problems, no prolonged discussions over the erection of a museum, city hall or courthouse to interrupt one in his thinking and practicing. About the only things to talk about were the training, feeding and clothing of one's family, religion and war. And our pioneers gave all of the 24 hours of a day they could spare from sleep (and they could get along on less sleep than we do, especially in the early morning), to these three things. And they usually mastered them. Their children were well fed on wholesome food and had rosy cheeks. They were well clad in linsey-woolsey and kept well and warm. They were well trained and hence were moral and clean and reverent. No over-crowded jails in that day. An open crime then shocked an entire community sick and pale.

Jean BERTOLET lived in that day and reared his family amid those environments. No wonder he transmitted such a stock of intelligent, sturdy, progressive, patriotic, and religious leaders in his progeny! He set them a pace, an example. He was prominent among the Moravian revivalists of his day, attended ZINZENDORF's conferences for the establishment of a Pennsylvania synod and furthered the enlightening teachings and religious cult of that wonderful pastor in his closing days, his own son-in-law, Or George DeBENNEVILLE. No wonder his descendants should arise and call him blessed and revere his memory and mark his resting place. He must have had a helpful and healing touch on his times as he casts his long shadow into our day of 200 years after.

Chateau D.Oex, Switzerland later became Minfeld, Germany

Buriedin the family graveyard at the Bertolet Homestead in Oley Twp.

John Bartolet paid taxes on 200 acres of land in 1734.
picture

Daniel /HOCH/ and Mary (Maria) /BERTOLET/




Husband Daniel /HOCH/ 2

           Born: 18 Jan 1730-18 Jan 1731 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
     Christened: 
           Died: 29 Aug 1789 - Berks, Pennsylvania 10
         Buried:  - HochPrivate Cemetery #2  **chane Me**


         Father: Samuel /HOCH/ (1702-Abt 1762) 2
         Mother: Sarah /BAUMAN/ (1700-Between 1753/1790) 1 2 11


       Marriage: 1755 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 3

Noted events in his life were:
1. Residence, 1752 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania




Wife Mary (Maria) /BERTOLET/ 2

           Born: 18 Sep 1736 - OleyTwp, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 3 6
     Christened: 
           Died: 17 Jul 1802 - Berks, Pennsylvania 6
         Buried:  - HochPrivate Cemetery #2  **chane Me**


         Father: Abraham /BERTOLET/ (1712-1766) 2
         Mother: Esther /DETURCK/ (1710-1798) 1 2



Noted events in her life were:
1. Probate 12, 1802 - Berks, Pennsylvania



Children
1 M Daniel Bertolet /HOCH/ 2 13

           Born: 29 Oct 1755 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania
     Christened: 
           Died: 7 Oct 1835 - Berks, Pennsylvania
         Buried:  - HochPrivate Cemetery #1  **chane Me**
         Spouse: Susanna /YODER/ (Between 1762/1767-1809) 2
           Marr: 3 Nov 1789 - OleyTwp, Berks, Pennsylvania 14 15




General Notes: Husband - Daniel /HOCH/

From Friedensburg Road, 1.5 miles south of Oley, sharp left onto dirt lane leading diagonally up hillside at small cement bridge. Cemetary located between old and new houses situated at top of hill.

Listed as single on tax records

Danielcreated a will (vol B, pg 252 & vol 3, pg 101) with Samuel and Daniel Hoch as executors.


General Notes: Wife - Mary (Maria) /BERTOLET/

Place is assumed.

Probate Records of Berks County, Index to Administration Letters -- Mary Hoch, 1802, volume 6, page 73, Administrator: Peter Rapp.


General Notes: Child - Daniel Bertolet /HOCH/

Zion Union Church. Maxatawney, Twp.
picture

Wesley G. /CONWAY/ and Matty /BESSIE/




Husband Wesley G. /CONWAY/

           Born: 1860
     Christened: 
           Died: 1923
         Buried: 


         Father: Joseph /CONWAY/ (1816-1895)
         Mother: Malvina /SANFORD/ (1823-1898)


       Marriage: 




Wife Matty /BESSIE/ (details suppressed for this person)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Glenn M. /CONWAY/

           Born: 1883
     Christened: 
           Died: 1966
         Buried: 




picture
Richard /FETTIPLACE/ and Elizabeth /BESSILES/




Husband Richard /FETTIPLACE/

           Born: Abt 1460 - EastShelford, Berkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1511 - Bessiles-Leigh, Berkshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: John /FETTIPLACE/ (Abt 1427-1464)
         Mother: Jane /FABIAN/ (Abt 1435-      ) 1


       Marriage: Bef 1484




Wife Elizabeth /BESSILES/

           Born: Abt 1465 - Bessiles-Leigh, Berkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1511
         Buried: 


         Father: William /BESSILES/ (1444-1515)
         Mother: Alice /HARCOURT/ (Abt 1450-      )





Children
1 F Anne /FETTIPLACE/

           Born: 16 Jul 1496 - ShelfordParva, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 16 Aug 1568
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Edward (Purefoy) /PURIFOY/ (1494-1558) 1
           Marr: Bef 1533




General Notes: Husband - Richard /FETTIPLACE/

Ancestral File No 8J0G-2K


General Notes: Wife - Elizabeth /BESSILES/

Ancestral File No 8H0G-3Q


General Notes: Child - Anne /FETTIPLACE/

Ancestral File No 8H0G-1D
picture

William /BESSILES/ and Alice /HARCOURT/




Husband William /BESSILES/

           Born: 1444 - Bessiles-Leigh, Berkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1515 - , England
         Buried: 


         Father: Thomas /DE BESSILES/ (Abt 1390-1459) 1
         Mother: Clemence // (Abt 1405-      ) 1


       Marriage: Bef 1465 - , England




Wife Alice /HARCOURT/

           Born: Abt 1450 - Stanton-Harcourt, Oxfordshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died:  - , Berkshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Richard /HARCOURT/ (Abt 1416-1486)
         Mother: Edith (Elizabeth) Saint /CLARE/





Children
1 F Elizabeth /BESSILES/

           Born: Abt 1465 - Bessiles-Leigh, Berkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1511
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Richard /FETTIPLACE/ (Abt 1460-1511)
           Marr: Bef 1484




General Notes: Husband - William /BESSILES/

Ancestral File No. 8ML8-GX


General Notes: Child - Elizabeth /BESSILES/

Ancestral File No 8H0G-3Q
picture

Adam /BEST/ and Elizabeth /CAMPBELL/




Husband Adam /BEST/

           Born: Abt 1800
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Elizabeth /CAMPBELL/

           Born: 1802
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry /CAMPBELL/ (1771-      )
         Mother: Margaret /DARBY/ (1779-1819)





Children
picture

Sources


1 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998).

2 http://www.familytreemaker.com, http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/n/o/r/Carol-M-Norton/GENE7-0007.h tml.

3 Rev. Philip Columbus Croll, Annals Of The Oley Valley in Berks County, PA: Over Two Hundred Years of Local History of an American Canaan. (Reading, PA; Reading Eagle Press, 1926 [ s.l : s.n, 1974]).

4 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998), AFN: CT0G-L4.

5 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998), AFN:2M9S-LP.

6 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998), AFN: 18DF-088.

7 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998), AFN:18DD-ZZG.

8 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998), AFN:18DD-ZZG
AFN:18DF-00L.

9 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998), AFN:18DF-00L.

10 Church Records, Schwartzwald Reformed Church.

11 Broderbund Software, Broderbund Software Genealogy CD (Broderbund Software PO Box 6124 Novato, CA 94948-6125), WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0341.

12 FHL Microfilm (LDS, Salt Lake City, UT), Film 0020812.

13 Christopher K. Yoder, 75757.3371@CompuServe.COM, Archived text files from the Yoder Family Newsletter. Source documentation provided on-site
YNL, P O Box 594,Goshen, IN
(http://www.genealogy.org/~yoder/ AND http://www.yodernewsletter.org).

14 Frederic G. Paul and Jeffrey J. Howell, Berks County, Pennsylvania marriages, 1730-1800 (Reading, Pa. (4703 Ryan Ct., Reading 19606) : H P Pub., c1986-<c1987 >).

15 Church Records, Misc. Records of Rev. William Boos.


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